loudspeaker stereophilecom
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Loudspeaker stereophile 06142018


Loudspeaker stereophile 06142018


There are four six-inch woofers for the bass and 10 two-inch woofers for the midrange eight are dedicated to covering the Hz to 2kHz audio spectrum, while two are midrange tweeters that cover 2kHZ to 8kHz audio range. There is also one. This assortment of drivers has earned the McIntosh XR the distinction of being a four-way speaker.

Newswire Powered by. Close the menu. Rolling Stone. Log In. To help keep your account secure, please log-in again. You are no longer onsite at your organization. Please log in. For assistance, contact your corporate administrator. An elegant exterior can hide a multitude of sins, but this floorstander sounds as good as it looks. Unlock new sonic rewards by adding an active sub-bass speaker to your hi-fi setup. Fyne Audio F The Scottish company has a blossoming portfolio, but this might be its most exciting introduction yet.

Paradigm Persona B. Sporting advanced beryllium drivers, this standmount offers some serious hi-fi chemistry. Focal Chora A small speaker like a MicroWalsh can have amazing bass, but is unlikely to have great bass. Acoustic Research was only a few blocks from my dormitory at MIT and their speakers were very popular. The ARs provided fine bass and with the openness of the electrostatics, this system was the closest thing to true live music I had ever heard. Their biggest limitation came from their low sensitivity and the maximum output of the Dyanco Mark 3, Watt tube amps driving them.

I made a pilgrimage with another student to hear these famous speakers. This was dramatically demonstrated by a piece of music with a bass drum wallop toward the end that nearly knocked me out of my seat. This was actually a 3-speaker system with two corner horns and a Cornwall center channel. On the way home, my friend asked me if I had noticed dynamic range enhancement of the drum by the salesman with his quick flick of the volume knob at that precise time — up and then down.

I had not, but we tried to reproduce it in our dorm. We learned two things that day: louder is better, dynamic range is very important to music reproduction and that LPs were the limiting factor in this respect. Another refrigerator-sized speaker. They also offered factory assembled systems for the non-carpenters. This was a big system designed for big rooms and optimal listening was at fairly far distances typically feet back.

At this distance, they integrated well and had a very balanced sound, although a little light in the bass and soft in the treble.

If you had a big room and a fat wallet, you could enjoy great sound. With the four properly placed, the bass was just adequate, but the openness and detail was wonderful. The first time I heard the double-pair setup was also the first time I heard Dolby noise reduction getting rid of the annoying tape noise. It was funded by Koss Electronics. These were bigger and heavier than the KLH 9s and one pair could produce good bass extension.

Stereophile found them to be among the best two speaker systems they had ever heard double KLH 9s was the other. Since loudspeaker measurements are an inherently technical matter, it can be a bit challenging to state these concepts in much simpler terms, but we will try nonetheless. Sometimes this is referred to as the amplitude response as well.

Frequency response is a measure of how a speaker responds throughout the sound frequency spectrum for the same amount of amplification. The x-axis of a frequency response graph represents frequency, or what we hear as pitch, and the Y-axis of the graph represents amplitude, or what we hear as loudness.

An analogy would be how loud the keys on a piano sound when struck with the same force. Similar to how the pitch moves upward from left to right on a piano keyboard, a frequency response graph normally starts with low-frequency sound on the left side of the graph and raises in pitch to higher frequencies as it moves to the right. Ideally, a piano would play all of these notes at the same loudness when the keys are struck with the same force. Likewise, a perfectly behaving loudspeaker would have a totally even response throughout its frequency spectrum when given the same amount of amplification for all frequencies.

A loudspeaker with a perfect frequency response is impossible to achieve in reality, but many speaker manufacturers try to get as close as they are reasonably able. If the speaker is aimed directly at the listener, it would arguably be the most important single response measurement, since, of all the sound that the speaker is radiating would be what would arrive at the listener first. However, it is not always the case that the speaker will be pointed directly at the listener; listeners frequently end up listening to the speaker at a different angle.

A theoretical speaker that had a totally flat on-axis frequency response would indicate that it is able to reproduce the source content with perfect accuracy, at least for the position directly ahead of it. The further that the frequency response curve deviates from a flat shape, the less accurate the speaker is.

If the loudspeaker is not aimed directly at you as a listener, you are listening to it at an off-axis angle which usually has a different frequency response shape than the on-axis frequency response. For the sake of accuracy, off-axis responses should hold a flat shape too, naturally, but, as with the on-axis frequency response, that is an impossibility, so speaker designers normally try to have a smooth response that has a tight correlation to the on-axis frequency response. There are two major reasons for this.

First, many times listeners will not be listening to the speaker at an angle that is directly in front of it, so the speaker should try to sound good at other reasonable angles. Therefore, even if the direct on-axis sound was perfectly accurate, the speaker can still sound bad if sound emitted at other angles have a very poor frequency response. Generally, the most important off-axis angles that a speaker should hold a good response are those angles that are close to the on-axis angle, and the most important of these near on-axis angles are those that are on a horizontal plane to the on-axis angle.

For example, a listening area might be comprised of a wide sofa or sectional, so it will be a broad area horizontally, but rarely do people listen to their speakers at a substantially higher or lower angle, so potential listening positions tend to occupy a narrow vertical region.

It encompasses most of the area in which listeners would ever typically listen. The significance of the listening window response is that it will resemble the response that arrives at the listener's ears first, since most people will be listening within this angle with respect to the speaker. We mentioned before that much of what we hear from a typical home audio sound system is not direct sound from the speakers themselves but reflected sound from surfaces in the room such as walls, tables, floors, and pretty much any solid object.

These early reflections are important because, if their cumulative response is very uneven compared to the direct sound response of the speaker, they can harm the overall sound quality of the system.



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  1. German manufacturer Canton Elektronik has a strong presence in Europe, but distribution of its loudspeakers in the US has been sporadic. Consequently, the most recent review in Stereophile of a Canton speaker, the Reference DC, was in When we heard, in December , that Bluebird Music would be bringing Canton back to North America, we were eager to review a Canton loudspeaker.
  2. Aug 18,  · German manufacturer Canton Elektronik has a strong presence in Europe, but distribution of its loudspeakers in the US has been sporadic. Consequently, the most recent review in Stereophile of a Canton speaker, the Reference DC, was in When we heard, in December , that Bluebird Music would be bringing Canton back to North America, we were eager to review a Canton loudspeaker.
  3. Aug 26,  · German manufacturer Canton Elektronik has a strong presence in Europe, but distribution of its loudspeakers in the US has been sporadic. Consequently, the most recent review in Stereophile of a Canton speaker, the Reference DC, was in When we heard, in December , that Bluebird Music would be bringing Canton back to North America, we were eager to review a Canton loudspeaker.
  4. Mar 19,  · Loudspeaker Systems. Editor's Note: Class A "Loudspeakers" are sufficiently idiosyncratic and differ enough from one another that prospective customers should read Stereophile's original reviews in their entirety for descriptions of the vivaldiaudio.com have therefore just listed every system or combination that at least one of Stereophile's reviewers feels, as a result of his or her experience Estimated Reading Time: 9 mins.
  5. May 01,  · In the September issue of Stereophile, I wrote a rave review about the first speaker, the AE1, from what was to me a totally unknown English company, Acoustic Energy. Though tiny, and possessing an intrinsically limited low-frequency response, the $/pair AE1 was one of the most musical loudspeakers I have ever used, throwing a deep, beautifully defined soundstage, and .
  6. Nov 12,  · Thiel CS loudspeaker While almost every Stereophile writer nominated one of Jim Thiel's designs, it was the CS, from the early '90s, that was mentioned most often, rather than one of the Kentucky company's flagships. This is because the ' was the finest all-'round package in terms of time alignment, neutral balance, power handling.
  7. Jan 31,  · This is the title of a fascinating article in the current September Issue of The Absolute Sound. In it, eight current reviewers of TAS, including founder Harry Pearson, were asked to name the dozen speakers which they thought to be the 12 most significant loudspeakers of all time.
  8. May 30,  · Totem Acoustic's Arro is a small, but powerful tower speaker. Just inches wide and high, the built in Canada Arro can unfurl a huge, room filling soundstage. Great for home theater and.